Sunday, January 10, 2021

Calendar for 2021



Each year I make a calendar for G. to hang in the rooms in the office he works in. I have found making calendars to be a little harder than I first expected. Sometimes the printing doesn't pick up well on the light and shade, and sometimes the pictures just don't translate well to a calendar page. I've learned to buy a trial calendar to check it before ordering the rest. I use Shutterfly since they seem to have the best picture quality of the companies I've used. The other companies I've tried are Cafepress, Zazzle and Mixbook.


January
We haven't had much snow for several years, so I thought the best way to portray snowy white was in flower form. Clockwise from top: Hymenocallis, apple tree blossoms, an Atamasco lily, and a noid white iris.


February
Our native Jacob's ladder Polemonium reptans



March
Eastern redbud with bumblebee. Redbuds are immensely popular with bees when they bloom in March; they drone like a hive with all the bees buzzing about.


April
A shot of the big perennial bed in late April. Baptisia alba and 'Purple Smoke' with rugosas in the background.


May
Swamp roses from Antique Roses Emporium lining the big perennial bed and the beds beside the neighbor's pasture.


June
'Ada May Musick', with that watercolor blue purple eye that I love in a daylily.



July
A noid yellow daylily, with a now noid peach from Wayside. 'Bleu Celeste' and Monarda 'Raspberry Wine' in the background. I have several yellow daylilies, and while I could in all honestly proclaim practically each one as one of the best, this one really is one of the best. The flower has a lovely graceful form and the sweet fragrance is outstanding.


August
Summer phlox 'Robert Poore' with carpenter bee. Carpenter bees and swallowtails absolutely love summer phlox.


September
Bidens with bumblebees



October
All pictures are of the shrub 'Old Blush' except for rugosa rubra in the bottom left.



November
I made a collage in Shutterfly that I can't easily replicate elsewhere, so I just put up the three pictures that I used. They feature a red maple I nicknamed the apricot maple due to the color of its spring flowers and its fall color. Sadly, we don't have that tree anymore; it had multiple leaders and started to split down the middle. Eventually one trunk was going to end up across our driveway and another across the neighbor's fence, so I had to have it removed.


December
Clockwise from top left: 'Jesse's Song' and noid white; Verbena 'Homestead'; 'Jesse's Song' again; and 'Crimson King'.

8 comments:

  1. Beautifully done, sweetbay. I've never tried making my own calendar, although a friend created one from some of my blog post photos last year and it was interesting to see what she pulled out.

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    1. I’d like to see the calendar your friend created!

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  2. That sounds fun and a wonderful idea. I love the shot of the bumblebee. And of course, the swamp rose. Just stunning!

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  3. What a wonderful way to bring the garden to the office! I've used Shutterfly before to make photobooks but never a calendar. It is a lot of work. Nicely done!

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  4. Thank you Karin. G. finds it really helpful to have a calendar in the rooms and the patients like them, which is why I’ve kept doing it. It is work, especially the inefficient way in which I do it. lol

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  5. Love the images you selected for the calendar. The Jacob's ladder reminds me I need to look for that this year. I've never been able to keep it growing but it's such a charming plant.

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    1. Thank you Susie. Jacob’s Ladder has been tenacious if it can carve out a space for itself at the edge of a bed and seems to prefer a spot on the drier side. I’ve had some for several years now. I grew mine from seed from the NC Botanical Garden, through their seed distribution program.

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